• Skill

5 Things Artists Should Stop Doing

As an artist we are constantly trying to navigate through the music industry and taking on advise on how to progress in our music hustle.


With that being said, we often forget to evaluate some of the methods we were using previously. One thing I can say is that the FB spam and tag tactic has decreased but here are 5 other things I think that artist should consider abandoning.


1. Valuing Meaning-less Stats

We all want many people following our pages/profiles but, it really doesn’t matter unless they are active followers.

Having 5000 followers means nothing if you’re struggling to get any engagement from the 5000 followers. A good rule of thumb is to aim for 10% engagement from your followers. If you’re getting less, your audience is basically a dud.

This is not set in stone because the platforms have different algorithms but compare this to the reach your post sees.


2. Follow for Follow / Follow Unfollow tactics

I first heard of these tactics when it came to Twitter. This is another tactic that should be abandoned.


The truth is, if you look at the person’s profile and there is nothing that resonates with you, then you’re doing the person a disservice. You’re also contributing to their meaning-less stats.


Obvious there are exceptions, like if the person could be a potential collab / customer / fan etc. but if it’s a matter of following because they followed, then it’s best to leave that to 2018.


3. Implementing Music Goal without Considering the Budget

We all have dreams. Some bigger than others but we all dream but when it comes to music, I believe we should be planning a few steps ahead.

What do I mean by this?


If you’re putting in money for a goal, it should ideally be to service something else and hopefully create money too. For example, buying a microphone for yourself and squad so that you don’t have to pay someone else to record. You’ll also be able to record other people to get an income.


I recently wrote a blog post about leasing exclusive beats. If you don’t have a good budget or any clue if you’ll make that money back, you should be leasing beats non-exclusively. To read why I say this, click here.


4. Inconsistency on Social


This thing of disappearing for weeks on end and only posting when you’re releasing music is another outdated tactic.


The rock artists about 10 years ago were able to pull it off but if you’re an independent musician from South Africa, consistency is key.


I repeat…


CONSISTENCY IS KEY!


The reason why musicians struggle with consistency is because they don’t know what to post about. Well, social media is about… being social. Give your following a view into your life, what you enjoy, random day-to-day stuff and mix that up with the music posts.


This doesn’t just apply to social media posting but music releases too. With the way we consume music now, muso’s must be releasing once a month or two. People get bored of music, especially if it’s not a hit and they need something new often.

Set up a content schedule and create some themes such as #TBT or #FF.


5. Marketing to Other Musicians

Do you think Pick n Pay markets to Spar?! Noooo!

So, stop hustling your fellow musicians so much. Sharing with other musicians is okay but to be spending most of your marketing efforts on other musicians is a waste of time. They are less likely to share your stuff because they are competing for the same attention from their audience.


The FB music groups. Don’t waste your time sharing with them either.

An exception is if you’re trying to build a relationship with another muso, then it’s valid. But if you’re sending a generic “Please show support and like and share this track.” Or “The much-anticipated track…” spam message, you’re wasting your time.


You’ll probably have more success DM’in your friends. Find your true fans and not fellow musicians.


These 5 points are my opinion and you feel differently, don’t be shy to leave a comment. If you’ve got marketing tactics that you’d like to discuss, hit me up on whatsapp +27 (0)83 570 9602 or email info@skillmusicsa.com


Until Next Time,

Skill

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